Emerald Island Adventures

PO Box 177 Craig Alaska

907-321-5772

emeraldislandak@gmail.com

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Emerald Island Adventures is an equal opportunity provider operating on the Tongass National Forest under special use permit from the Forest Service, USDA.

Regional Climate

If there is one element that ties the region of southeast Alaska together: it is WATER.  The islands that make up the Alexander Archipelago are separated by large channels of water, and flanked by the north Pacific Ocean to the west.  The "warm" ocean currents bring in storm systems which send high levels of precipitation to the region, dropping as much as 120" of rain per year or more in some locations. Every aspect of the ecosystem relies on this continuous cycle of precipitation, from the salmon needing to get upstream in the summer months to the abundant lichens and mosses which adorn trees and forest floor.

Humpback Whales

January 01, 2020

Humpback whales are the most common cetaceans in southeast Alaska.  Other cetaceans include porpoises, dolphins, other whales such as blue, grey, and killer whales.  

The population of humpback whales experienced a decline during the last century when whaling efforts reached southeast Alaska.  They have been recovering and thousands of whales can be seen in southeast Alaska waters during the summer.  Humpback whales may be seen alone, or in groups of up to 10 individuals, or occasionally more.  

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February 23, 2023

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May 28, 2023

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Regional Climate

If there is one element that ties the region of southeast Alaska together: it is WATER.  The islands that make up the Alexander Archipelago are separated by large channels of water, and flanked by the north Pacific Ocean to the west.  The "warm" ocean currents bring in storm systems which send high levels of precipitation to the region, dropping as much as 120" of rain per year or more in some locations. Every aspect of the ecosystem relies on this continuous cycle of precipitation, from the salmon needing to get upstream in the summer months to the abundant lichens and mosses which adorn trees and forest floor.